Tuesday, November 22, 2022

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving week, in my mind, marks the start of "raptor season" when hawks and falcons in this area become more visible, mostly due to the trees dropping their view-obstructing leaves. It's also the time of year when many hawks are migrating and stir up activity when they cross through the territory of resident raptors who are quick to defend their turf.

I'm thankful to live in a place where I can witness these activities up close, and am grateful every day to be sharing the same living space and time with these amazing creatures, especially red-tailed hawk, Christo, who holds a special place in my heart.

Christo, the resident red-tailed hawk of the East Village.

It's been a privilege to observe Christo grow from an energetic and flamboyant immature bird into the skilled mature hunter he is today.

Christo, the resident red-tailed hawk of the East Village.

As Christo fascinated me with his relationship with his first mate, Dora, he continues to inspire with his relationship with current mate, Amelia. Their communication with each other confounds me, and I love it.

Red-tailed hawks Amelia and Christo.

Amelia is an impressive hawk on her own. She's large, gorgeous, and exudes confidence and calm.

East Village resident red-tailed hawk, Amelia.
 
East Village resident red-tailed hawk, Amelia.

Amelia has a style all her own, and I adore and admire her.
 
East Village resident red-tailed hawk, Amelia.

Although I post mostly photos of Christo and Amelia here, I spend all my free time seeking out raptors all over the city. I feel very fortunate to live in a place where so many natural areas can be accessed via public transportation. 

This is an immature red-tailed hawk recently seen in Brooklyn.

Immature red-tailed hawk flying with a full crop.

Immature red-tailed hawk.

This adult Cooper's hawk was also observed in Brooklyn. It was calling to another Cooper's who was hidden in some trees.

Adult Cooper's hawk.

I caught this adult Cooper's hawk flying around Jamaica Bay, Queens.

Adult Cooper's hawk.

Adult Cooper's hawk.

Jamaica Bay is a wonderful place to observe wildlife, including this immature Northern Harrier.

Immature Northern Harrier.

An immature Peregrine Falcon flew right over me near Battery Park, possibly one of the offspring from the falcon pair that nests in lower Manhattan.

Immature Peregrine Falcon.

I found this male American Kestrel in Brooklyn, hunting for insects. These little falcons can be found all over the city.

Adult male kestrel.

Adult male kestrel.

This immature kestrel perched in a tree so quietly and still, I almost didn't see it as I passed by.

Immature male kestrel.

As kestrel populations are in decline across the continent, it's remarkable to see them living among us in this extremely urban environment, another thing for which to be thankful.

Immature male kestrel.

Immature male kestrel.

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