Wednesday, June 8, 2022

Branching and fledging - Part 2

As previously noted, the first of the Tompkins Square Park red-tailed hawks chicks fledged on June 6. We visited the park yesterday and saw two flying around with the parents, so the third is likely to fledge any time.

This is Fledgling #1 exploring the branches of the nest tree:

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #1

Tompkins red-tail chick #1 branching

Tompkins red-tail chick #1 branching

Back at the nest, mom Amelia watches #2 practice flapping its wings.
 
Amelia watches one of her kids flap

Then #1 makes a flight to a neighboring tree.

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #1

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #1

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #1

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #1

Fledgling #1 made a few back-and-forth flights, looking great and sticking the landings.

Chick #2 seemed inspired by its sibling and continued practicing at the nest.

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #2

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #2

Then #2 ventured out to the far limbs of the tree and let us see its big and beautiful wings.

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #2

Looking a little nervous!

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #2

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #2

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #2

After exercising for a while, #2 settled in and rested in the evening sun. It would then take a flight to another part of the tree where it tangled in some branches, but we are considering that mostly a fledge.

Tompkins red-tail fledgling #2

This is #3, taking in the activities of its siblings and making flight plans of its own...

Tompkins red-tail chick #3


This is a very exciting time for these birds and also a time when they are very vulnerable. They are now focused on learning to fly and land safely. They will likely try and stay in the trees for several days until they get their strength and confidence up to be able to maneuver and become familiar with their environment.
 
At some point, they will come to the ground to play or practice hunting. It's imperative that people be aware of this and give them plenty of space. Please keep dogs off the fenced-in lawns as dogs pose a huge threat to the birds. Every year, we have to argue with dog owners about keeping their dogs in the dog run and are met with entitled indignant hostility, which ruins the experience for everyone. Tompkins Square Park has minimal staffing, so we must take care of the park ourselves, which includes taking care of the wildlife.

Seeing hawks running around on the ground is normal as they are likely playing. However, if you see one that appears to be in distress or is sick (eyes closed, drooped head, not moving), call 311 and ask for the Urban Park Rangers. More wildlife help info can be found on this page.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.